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Texas Politics - Bureaucracy
 
 
 
Federal employment across the states Federal employment across the states
5.4    Federal Government Employment in Texas

Even though federal employment within the state is independent of the state bureaucracy (except in instances of joint programs), its substantial size warrants a quick look.

Texas has ranked third among states in recent years (including the District of Columbia) in terms of total federal government employment, with almost 166 thousand federal employees working in the state. This does not count the tens of thousands of military personnel at Ft. Hood, home of two of the nation's ten army divisions, and other military installations.

While Texas ranks very high among the states, this again seems to be a result of the size of the state population. The percentage of the state population employed by the federal government is actually on the low end of the scale compared to other states. The District of Columbia and adjacent states have inordinately high percentages of their populations working for the federal government, an obvious result of proximity to the nation's capital.

These federal workers are employed around the state in government offices and facilities in almost every major city. One major source of civilian employment is the U.S. Postal Service. With approximately 690 thousand sorters, drivers, retail clerks, and delivery personnel distributed throughout the country, the postal service maintains a large footprint in every state.

Other federal departments and agencies also maintain a large workforce in the state including those in law enforcement, social security, healthcare, education, environmental protection, and more. Adding the number of federal, state and local full-time equivalent positions together equals approximately 6.5 percent of the total Texas population. As a percentage of total full-time employment, this figure would be much higher.

Texas Politics:
© 2009, Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services
University of Texas at Austin
3rd Edition - Revision 115
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